July 31, 1937: Call us certified knuckleheads, but we at the Digs are big fans of the Three Stooges. When we saw this picture in a pile of yet-to-be-filed prints, we yelped, “woop woop woop” and immediately began poking each other in the eyes. 
The image captures the Stooges in their prime. Their comedy shorts, produced by Columbia Pictures, were a big draw at movie houses across the country. While not making films, Moe, Larry and Curly took their act on the road. They were performing at the Stanley Theater when a Pittsburgh Press photographer caught up with them. The Stooges clowned around in a dressing room to promote “Scramblegraph,” a contest unveiled by the newspaper. The Stanley, by the way, was a mecca for comedians — Jimmy Durante, Jack Benny, Laurel and Hardy, and Lucille Ball and Dezi Arnez all performed there.
The Stooges remain popular to this day. Is there a living room in the United States that hasn’t been subjected to “A Plumbing We Will Go” or “Disorder in the Court?”  We think the masters of mayhem are “poifect.” So stand aside. We gotta scram!
(The Pittsburgh Press photo)
— Steve Mellon

July 31, 1937: Call us certified knuckleheads, but we at the Digs are big fans of the Three Stooges. When we saw this picture in a pile of yet-to-be-filed prints, we yelped, “woop woop woop” and immediately began poking each other in the eyes. 

The image captures the Stooges in their prime. Their comedy shorts, produced by Columbia Pictures, were a big draw at movie houses across the country. While not making films, Moe, Larry and Curly took their act on the road. They were performing at the Stanley Theater when a Pittsburgh Press photographer caught up with them. The Stooges clowned around in a dressing room to promote “Scramblegraph,” a contest unveiled by the newspaper. The Stanley, by the way, was a mecca for comedians — Jimmy Durante, Jack Benny, Laurel and Hardy, and Lucille Ball and Dezi Arnez all performed there.

The Stooges remain popular to this day. Is there a living room in the United States that hasn’t been subjected to “A Plumbing We Will Go” or “Disorder in the Court?”  We think the masters of mayhem are “poifect.” So stand aside. We gotta scram!

(The Pittsburgh Press photo)

— Steve Mellon

Apr. 20, 1988:  Members of the Black Political Empowement Project and the NAACP: Tim Stevens, Ray Rucker and Georgetta Stevens unveil one of 25 new billboards going up throughout Pittsburgh that urge blacks to register to vote. 
Native of Pittsburgh, Tim Stevens founded the Black Empowerment Project (B-PEP) in 1986. The project is still active with a mission statement dedicated to promoting participation of African Americans in local, state, and national elections: “It’s a LIFETIME COMMITMENT: African Americans VOTE in each and every election!” Mr. Stevens has been a prominent advocate for civil rights in the Pittsburgh community. He served as both executive director and president of the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP.
This photograph was taken before the 1988 presidential election between Republican George H.W. Bush and Democrat Michael Dukakis.
(Photo by Joyce Mendelsohn, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Apr. 20, 1988:  Members of the Black Political Empowement Project and the NAACP: Tim Stevens, Ray Rucker and Georgetta Stevens unveil one of 25 new billboards going up throughout Pittsburgh that urge blacks to register to vote. 

Native of Pittsburgh, Tim Stevens founded the Black Empowerment Project (B-PEP) in 1986. The project is still active with a mission statement dedicated to promoting participation of African Americans in local, state, and national elections: “It’s a LIFETIME COMMITMENT: African Americans VOTE in each and every election!” Mr. Stevens has been a prominent advocate for civil rights in the Pittsburgh community. He served as both executive director and president of the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP.

This photograph was taken before the 1988 presidential election between Republican George H.W. Bush and Democrat Michael Dukakis.

(Photo by Joyce Mendelsohn, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Oct. 21, 1968:  Election Machine
In our archive library we found dozens of photographs in a folder labeled “Voting Machines.” As you cast your ballot on this election day, we decided to show you two of the photographs to set the contrast: one from 1968 and the other one from 1936 (below). “Machine Easy to Use” read the headline in the Post-Gazette. “A voter is pulling levers for Hubert Humphrey and Joseph Clark on voting machine.”
These machines were introduced before the 1968 election. On November 5, the GOP nominee, former Vice President Richard Nixon, won the election over the Democratic nominee, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. 
(Photo by Morris Bermatt, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Oct. 21, 1968:  Election Machine

In our archive library we found dozens of photographs in a folder labeled “Voting Machines.” As you cast your ballot on this election day, we decided to show you two of the photographs to set the contrast: one from 1968 and the other one from 1936 (below). “Machine Easy to Use” read the headline in the Post-Gazette. “A voter is pulling levers for Hubert Humphrey and Joseph Clark on voting machine.”

These machines were introduced before the 1968 election. On November 5, the GOP nominee, former Vice President Richard Nixon, won the election over the Democratic nominee, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. 

(Photo by Morris Bermatt, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

July 27, 1936: Pittsburgh election officials testing election machines three months before the presidential election between Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt and Republican Alf Landon.
(Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph photo)
— Mila Sanina

July 27, 1936: Pittsburgh election officials testing election machines three months before the presidential election between Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt and Republican Alf Landon.

(Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph photo)

— Mila Sanina

May 7, 1919: We at the Digs have witnessed some astonishing parades in our city. During the 2006 Super Bowl victory parade, people on Fifth Avenue were packed as tightly as the vinyl discs at Jerry’s Records on Murray Avenue. The throng choked the street. Vehicles carrying players couldn’t pass. Ben and Charlie, standing in the back of a stalled pickup truck, smiled and thew up their arms.
But the parade pictured here may have been the granddaddy of them all. Pittsburgh’s sons and soldiers were returning victorious from the bloody fields of France. The Great War had ended. A city that seemed to do everything on a grand scale planned a fitting pageant.
Members of the Old Eighteenth Infantry Regiment and the Fifteenth Engineers arrived at the East Liberty train station before dawn, then disembarked and marched to the Syria Mosque in Oakland. Police roped off the street but, the Gazette-Times reported, “mothers leaped the barriers in almost hysterical joy and, grasping their sons to their breasts, wept and laughed …”
The khaki-clad troops ate breakfast at the Mosque, celebrated with their families, then reformed to march along Fifth Avenue to the downtown district. Crowds packed streets all along the route. This picture shows the Fifteenth Engineers marching along Fifth Avenue at the Smithfield Street intersection. You can see the famous Kaufmann’s clock in the upper right corner. The parade continued to the Point, to a reviewing stand that extended three blocks on Liberty Avenue. The stand alone seated 7,000.
It was a day of jubilation mixed with sadness and tears. Two years earlier, these same troops had paraded through Pittsburgh in a grand sendoff to war. Many did not return.
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

May 7, 1919: We at the Digs have witnessed some astonishing parades in our city. During the 2006 Super Bowl victory parade, people on Fifth Avenue were packed as tightly as the vinyl discs at Jerry’s Records on Murray Avenue. The throng choked the street. Vehicles carrying players couldn’t pass. Ben and Charlie, standing in the back of a stalled pickup truck, smiled and thew up their arms.

But the parade pictured here may have been the granddaddy of them all. Pittsburgh’s sons and soldiers were returning victorious from the bloody fields of France. The Great War had ended. A city that seemed to do everything on a grand scale planned a fitting pageant.

Members of the Old Eighteenth Infantry Regiment and the Fifteenth Engineers arrived at the East Liberty train station before dawn, then disembarked and marched to the Syria Mosque in Oakland. Police roped off the street but, the Gazette-Times reported, “mothers leaped the barriers in almost hysterical joy and, grasping their sons to their breasts, wept and laughed …”

The khaki-clad troops ate breakfast at the Mosque, celebrated with their families, then reformed to march along Fifth Avenue to the downtown district. Crowds packed streets all along the route. This picture shows the Fifteenth Engineers marching along Fifth Avenue at the Smithfield Street intersection. You can see the famous Kaufmann’s clock in the upper right corner. The parade continued to the Point, to a reviewing stand that extended three blocks on Liberty Avenue. The stand alone seated 7,000.

It was a day of jubilation mixed with sadness and tears. Two years earlier, these same troops had paraded through Pittsburgh in a grand sendoff to war. Many did not return.

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

May 7, 1919 (top) and May 8, 1919: With their coverage of the great parade welcoming home World War I soldiers, Pittsburgh’s newspapers tried to match the grandeur of the event.

— Steve Mellon

Apr. 22, 2008:  Illinois Sen. Barack Obama at Pamela’s Diner in Pittsburgh
During his campaign stop in Pittsburgh, Sen. Barack Obama visited Pamela’s restaurant in the Strip District. What do you think he ordered? Pancakes that were really, really good.  
"These really were maybe the best pancakes I’ve tasted in a very long time. Get some take-out," he directed the reporters. "You don’t even need syrup on them. They’ve got [these] crispy edges. Yea, they are really good."
At the end of Mr. Obama’s visit to Pamela’s, someone gave him a Terrible Towel, which, “with a fierce grin,” as Post-Gazette described it, “he waved over his head a few times.”
 (Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Apr. 22, 2008:  Illinois Sen. Barack Obama at Pamela’s Diner in Pittsburgh

During his campaign stop in Pittsburgh, Sen. Barack Obama visited Pamela’s restaurant in the Strip District. What do you think he ordered? Pancakes that were really, really good.  

"These really were maybe the best pancakes I’ve tasted in a very long time. Get some take-out," he directed the reporters. "You don’t even need syrup on them. They’ve got [these] crispy edges. Yea, they are really good."

At the end of Mr. Obama’s visit to Pamela’s, someone gave him a Terrible Towel, which, “with a fierce grin,” as Post-Gazette described it, “he waved over his head a few times.”

(Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Apr. 15, 2008: Sen. Barack Obama interviewed by the editorial board of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette before the Democratic presidential primary.
Excerpts of Sen. Obama’s interview with the editorial board appeared in the Post-Gazette the next day.
The Post-Gazette endorsed the nomination of Sen. Barack Obama over Sen. Hillary Clinton:  ”Sen. Obama has captured much of the nation’s imagination for a reason. He offers real change, a vision of an America that can move past not only racial tensions but also the political partisanship that has so bedeviled it.”
(Photo by Rebecca Droke, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Apr. 15, 2008: Sen. Barack Obama interviewed by the editorial board of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette before the Democratic presidential primary.

Excerpts of Sen. Obama’s interview with the editorial board appeared in the Post-Gazette the next day.

The Post-Gazette endorsed the nomination of Sen. Barack Obama over Sen. Hillary Clinton:  ”Sen. Obama has captured much of the nation’s imagination for a reason. He offers real change, a vision of an America that can move past not only racial tensions but also the political partisanship that has so bedeviled it.”

(Photo by Rebecca Droke, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Apr. 15, 2008: Arizona Sen. John McCain speaking in the Wiegand Gymnasium at Carnegie Mellon University.
The Republican presidential nominee gave a major speech outlining his economic plan for the United States. In closing remarks of that speech, Sen. McCain said: “In the weeks and months ahead, I will detail my plans to reform health care in America… to make our schools more accountable to parents and taxpayers… to keep America’s edge in technology… to use the power of free markets to grow our economy… to escape our dependence on foreign oil… and to guard against climate change and to be better stewards of the earth.”
Sen. McCain was defeated by Sen. Obama in the presidential election on November 4, in both the electoral and popular vote by the largest margin in 20 years. McCain received 173 electoral votes and Obama received 365. Barack Obama became the 44th President of the United States and was inaugurated on Tuesday, January 20, 2009.
(Photo by V.W.H Campbell, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Apr. 15, 2008: Arizona Sen. John McCain speaking in the Wiegand Gymnasium at Carnegie Mellon University.

The Republican presidential nominee gave a major speech outlining his economic plan for the United States. In closing remarks of that speech, Sen. McCain said: “In the weeks and months ahead, I will detail my plans to reform health care in America… to make our schools more accountable to parents and taxpayers… to keep America’s edge in technology… to use the power of free markets to grow our economy… to escape our dependence on foreign oil… and to guard against climate change and to be better stewards of the earth.”

Sen. McCain was defeated by Sen. Obama in the presidential election on November 4, in both the electoral and popular vote by the largest margin in 20 years. McCain received 173 electoral votes and Obama received 365. Barack Obama became the 44th President of the United States and was inaugurated on Tuesday, January 20, 2009.

(Photo by V.W.H Campbell, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Apr. 19, 2004: Senators Rick Santorum, left, Arlen Specter, right, and President George W. Bush raise their hands together before a speech by Bush at the David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown Pittsburgh.   
"On his 27th visit to Pennsylvania, a crucial state for his re-election hopes, President Bush sought votes for himself and for U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter in his renomination battle against conservative U.S. Rep. Pat Toomey."
Specter, who traveled to Pittsburgh with Bush on Air Force One along with U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, basked in the presidential praise. “The image of the three of them, arms linked before the cheering crowd, is certain to become familiar to the state’s television viewers between now and now and next week’s primary.”
"I appreciate my friendship with Arlen Specter," the president said. "He’s been a friend for quite a while. I’m proud to campaign for him." He then added, "He’s a bit independent-minded sometime. But there’s nothing wrong with that." 
(Photo by John Beale, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Apr. 19, 2004: Senators Rick Santorum, left, Arlen Specter, right, and President George W. Bush raise their hands together before a speech by Bush at the David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown Pittsburgh.   

"On his 27th visit to Pennsylvania, a crucial state for his re-election hopes, President Bush sought votes for himself and for U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter in his renomination battle against conservative U.S. Rep. Pat Toomey."

Specter, who traveled to Pittsburgh with Bush on Air Force One along with U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, basked in the presidential praise. “The image of the three of them, arms linked before the cheering crowd, is certain to become familiar to the state’s television viewers between now and now and next week’s primary.”

"I appreciate my friendship with Arlen Specter," the president said. "He’s been a friend for quite a while. I’m proud to campaign for him." He then added, "He’s a bit independent-minded sometime. But there’s nothing wrong with that." 

(Photo by John Beale, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

July 6, 2004:  Democratic candidate John Kerry reaches for a boxing glove from someone in the crowd at Market Square in Downtown Pittsburgh.
It was here that U.S. Senator from Massachusetts announced that John Edwards would be his running mate on the Democratic ticket. But people at Market Square were not the first to get the scoop on Tuesday, according to the Post-Gazette.
"Bryan Smith,a 39-year-old US Airways mechanic, was the first to tell the world of Kerry’s choice. Smith, while at work Monday evening near Pittsburgh International Airport, spotted the Kerry campaign plane being affixed with Edwards decals. After leaving work, he posted the news at 11:45 pm on an obscure Web site known as usaviation.com."
In doing so, Smith became the first person to report on Kerry’s VP choice, beating Kerry’s announcement at Market Square by full nine hours and scooping the nation’s largest newspapers and television networks — all of which were working tirelessly to break the story first.
The Bush/Cheney ticket defeated the Kerry/Edwards team by 35 electoral votes: Bush received 286 votes and Kerry received 251. George W. Bush was inaugurated for the second time on January 20th, 2005.
(Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

July 6, 2004:  Democratic candidate John Kerry reaches for a boxing glove from someone in the crowd at Market Square in Downtown Pittsburgh.

It was here that U.S. Senator from Massachusetts announced that John Edwards would be his running mate on the Democratic ticket. But people at Market Square were not the first to get the scoop on Tuesday, according to the Post-Gazette.

"Bryan Smith,a 39-year-old US Airways mechanic, was the first to tell the world of Kerry’s choice. Smith, while at work Monday evening near Pittsburgh International Airport, spotted the Kerry campaign plane being affixed with Edwards decals. After leaving work, he posted the news at 11:45 pm on an obscure Web site known as usaviation.com."

In doing so, Smith became the first person to report on Kerry’s VP choice, beating Kerry’s announcement at Market Square by full nine hours and scooping the nation’s largest newspapers and television networks — all of which were working tirelessly to break the story first.

The Bush/Cheney ticket defeated the Kerry/Edwards team by 35 electoral votes: Bush received 286 votes and Kerry received 251. George W. Bush was inaugurated for the second time on January 20th, 2005.

(Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Nov. 4, 2000: Texas Gov. George W. Bush kisses a young supporter during a rally for the Republican presidential nominee at Pittsburgh International Airport, just three days before the presidential election.  Thousands of people turned out to cheer Bush and several Republicans running for office in Western Pennsylvania.
At the rally, Governor Bush pleaded with his supporters to intensify their efforts in the little time left. He promised “to purge this country of the old style politics, of the old way of politics.”The election result, specifically the awarding of Florida’s 25 electoral votes to Governor Bush, was challenged by the Gore campaign, which requested a hand recount in Florida.  On Dec. 12, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the statewide recount unconstitutional and George W. Bush was inaugurated as the 43rd President of the United States on Jan. 20, 2001.  Bush won the election by receiving 271 electoral votes versus Gore’s 266.  Vice President Gore won the popular vote.
(Photo by Steve Mellon, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Nov. 4, 2000: Texas Gov. George W. Bush kisses a young supporter during a rally for the Republican presidential nominee at Pittsburgh International Airport, just three days before the presidential election.  Thousands of people turned out to cheer Bush and several Republicans running for office in Western Pennsylvania.

At the rally, Governor Bush pleaded with his supporters to intensify their efforts in the little time left. He promised “to purge this country of the old style politics, of the old way of politics.”

The election result, specifically the awarding of Florida’s 25 electoral votes to Governor Bush, was challenged by the Gore campaign, which requested a hand recount in Florida.  On Dec. 12, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the statewide recount unconstitutional and George W. Bush was inaugurated as the 43rd President of the United States on Jan. 20, 2001.  

Bush won the election by receiving 271 electoral votes versus Gore’s 266.  Vice President Gore won the popular vote.

(Photo by Steve Mellon, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Sept. 4, 2000: Vice President Al Gore greets supporters after a Labor Day Parade at Point State Park.
An article describing Al Gore’s visit in the Post-Gazette read: “As he ran through lines of cheering supporters, Al Gore’s arms spread like wings. He banked from side to side, trading high fives with the crowd lining his path into Point State Part as the National Association of Letter Carriers band serenaded him with the Pennsylvania Polka.”The vice president marched the last 200 yards of the Labor Day Parade before “offering a working-class appeal of Democratic partisans gathered in front of Point Park fountain.”“I want to fight for you, ” said Gore. “That’s why I’m in this race. We’re for the people; they’re for the powerful.”
(Photo by Lake Fong, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Sept. 4, 2000: Vice President Al Gore greets supporters after a Labor Day Parade at Point State Park.

An article describing Al Gore’s visit in the Post-Gazette read: “As he ran through lines of cheering supporters, Al Gore’s arms spread like wings. He banked from side to side, trading high fives with the crowd lining his path into Point State Part as the National Association of Letter Carriers band serenaded him with the Pennsylvania Polka.”

The vice president marched the last 200 yards of the Labor Day Parade before “offering a working-class appeal of Democratic partisans gathered in front of Point Park fountain.”

“I want to fight for you, ” said Gore. “That’s why I’m in this race. We’re for the people; they’re for the powerful.”

(Photo by Lake Fong, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

February 1978: If you’re a Pittsburgher and you haven’t seen George Romero’s ‘Dawn of the Dead,’ then shame, shame on you. We at the Digs recommend you quickly find a copy and spend Halloween night watching zombies romp through the Monroeville Mall. Romero, by the way, is a 1960 Carnegie Mellon University graduate who redefined horror and made zombies cool. ‘Dawn’ is his second zombie flick — the first, ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ released in 1968, is a classic in its own right.
'Dawn of the Dead' is so gory it would make your eyes hurt if not for the cartoonishly red blood. It's also a clever satire on consumerism, according to critics who, for the most part, loved the movie. Dawn was listed #27 on Entertainment Weekly's list of top cult films, but we knew it was great cinema the moment was saw a hopelessly confused zombie stumbling down the mall's “up” escalator.
(Photo by Katherine Kolbert, Dawn Associates)
— Steve Mellon

February 1978: If you’re a Pittsburgher and you haven’t seen George Romero’s ‘Dawn of the Dead,’ then shame, shame on you. We at the Digs recommend you quickly find a copy and spend Halloween night watching zombies romp through the Monroeville Mall. Romero, by the way, is a 1960 Carnegie Mellon University graduate who redefined horror and made zombies cool. ‘Dawn’ is his second zombie flick — the first, ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ released in 1968, is a classic in its own right.

'Dawn of the Dead' is so gory it would make your eyes hurt if not for the cartoonishly red blood. It's also a clever satire on consumerism, according to critics who, for the most part, loved the movie. Dawn was listed #27 on Entertainment Weekly's list of top cult films, but we knew it was great cinema the moment was saw a hopelessly confused zombie stumbling down the mall's “up” escalator.

(Photo by Katherine Kolbert, Dawn Associates)

— Steve Mellon

Sept. 20, 1964: If you’re a baby boomer, you’ve probably seen this photograph before. It’s been called the “agony of defeat picture” — a phrase obviously coined by a boomer familiar with the dramatic introduction to ABC’s Wide World of Sports.
The image was made at Pitt Stadium on a Sunday afternoon in autumn of 1964. New York Giants quarterback Y.A. Tittle had just been the recipient of a ferocious hit by Steelers defensive end John Baker. Tittle was 38 years old — ancient, by football standards. He was one of the NFL’s best quarterbacks. But the moment this picture was made, Tittle’s career was nearing a painful conclusion. “That was the end of my dream,” he’d later say.
The photographer was the Post-Gazette’s Morris Berman, himself something of a legend. You’ve probably seen his 1945 picture of the bodies of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and his mistress hanging upside down. Those who worked with Berman at the PG say he always wore a suit, a tie and a smile. We often come across Berman’s photographs in the PG archives. They stand out as being carefully composed, and show that Berman had a knack for capturing moments that were at once surprising and representative of whatever news event he was covering.
Berman’s image of Tittle is one of a handful of football pictures that transcend the game. It stands as a reminder of what we all must face — aging, and the deterioration of our skills and abilities. In Berman’s picture, Tittle looks like a man who has lost his place in the world. It’s a painful and not uncommon thing.
Oh, and one other note: The Steelers won the game, 27-24.
— Steve Mellon
Order this photo at PG Store

Sept. 20, 1964: If you’re a baby boomer, you’ve probably seen this photograph before. It’s been called the “agony of defeat picture” — a phrase obviously coined by a boomer familiar with the dramatic introduction to ABC’s Wide World of Sports.

The image was made at Pitt Stadium on a Sunday afternoon in autumn of 1964. New York Giants quarterback Y.A. Tittle had just been the recipient of a ferocious hit by Steelers defensive end John Baker. Tittle was 38 years old — ancient, by football standards. He was one of the NFL’s best quarterbacks. But the moment this picture was made, Tittle’s career was nearing a painful conclusion. “That was the end of my dream,” he’d later say.

The photographer was the Post-Gazette’s Morris Berman, himself something of a legend. You’ve probably seen his 1945 picture of the bodies of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and his mistress hanging upside down. Those who worked with Berman at the PG say he always wore a suit, a tie and a smile. We often come across Berman’s photographs in the PG archives. They stand out as being carefully composed, and show that Berman had a knack for capturing moments that were at once surprising and representative of whatever news event he was covering.

Berman’s image of Tittle is one of a handful of football pictures that transcend the game. It stands as a reminder of what we all must face — aging, and the deterioration of our skills and abilities. In Berman’s picture, Tittle looks like a man who has lost his place in the world. It’s a painful and not uncommon thing.

Oh, and one other note: The Steelers won the game, 27-24.

— Steve Mellon

Order this photo at PG Store