April 28, 1989:  “Lemieux on the ice in Philadelphia”
Upon hearing last week that pucks would once again fly at the Consol Energy Center, we were inspired to dig though a box of aging prints in search of an historic hockey picture. We found this image of Penguins center Mario Lemieux joining his teammates shortly before a 1989 Patrick Division playoff game against the Flyers in Philadelphia. A few Flyers fans displayed signs that showed remarkable wit (wink, wink).
The Pens lost the series, but it proved a turning point for both teams. The Pens were on the verge of true glory — the team went onto win back-to-back Stanley Cups in 1991 and 1992. The Flyers, on the other hand, were soon to hit a dry spell. They failed even to make the playoffs for the next five seasons.
(Photo by Vince Musi, The Pittsburgh Press)
— Steve Mellon

April 28, 1989: “Lemieux on the ice in Philadelphia”

Upon hearing last week that pucks would once again fly at the Consol Energy Center, we were inspired to dig though a box of aging prints in search of an historic hockey picture. We found this image of Penguins center Mario Lemieux joining his teammates shortly before a 1989 Patrick Division playoff game against the Flyers in Philadelphia. A few Flyers fans displayed signs that showed remarkable wit (wink, wink).

The Pens lost the series, but it proved a turning point for both teams. The Pens were on the verge of true glory — the team went onto win back-to-back Stanley Cups in 1991 and 1992. The Flyers, on the other hand, were soon to hit a dry spell. They failed even to make the playoffs for the next five seasons.

(Photo by Vince Musi, The Pittsburgh Press)

— Steve Mellon

May 2, 1932: "The trial of Pittsburgh Mayor Charles Kline"
The date stamped on the back of this picture suggests it was made during the first day of former Mayor Charles Kline’s trial on charges of malfeasance. After his conviction, The Pittsburgh Press editorialized, “The little machine henchmen with their knowing smiles …. now know that no political machine is all powerful.”
Charles Kline (he’s the one smoking the cigarette) can be remembered for many things: He was a dapper dresser, and during his administration the skyline grew to include the Gulf Oil Tower, the Grant Building and the Koppers Building. He loved greeting famous people who visited the city. One day we’ll post a collection of pictures of Kline welcoming notable folks — among them President Calvin Coolidge, Charles Lindbergh, Mary Astor, Richard Byrd and Gene Tunney. Kline also was the last Republican elected mayor of the city.
But perhaps Kline is known best as the city’s most corrupt politician. His trouble began with the purchase of a $1,350 rug he said would “dignify the mayor’s office.” That purchase fueled a controversy that led to Kline’s indictment in a purchasing scandal. Kline was sentenced to jail, but never served because of ill health. He died a few months after his conviction.
The infamous Kline rug remained in the mayor’s office, becoming threadbare over the years, until Sophie Masloff ordered it removed in 1992.
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

May 2, 1932: "The trial of Pittsburgh Mayor Charles Kline"

The date stamped on the back of this picture suggests it was made during the first day of former Mayor Charles Kline’s trial on charges of malfeasance. After his conviction, The Pittsburgh Press editorialized, “The little machine henchmen with their knowing smiles …. now know that no political machine is all powerful.”

Charles Kline (he’s the one smoking the cigarette) can be remembered for many things: He was a dapper dresser, and during his administration the skyline grew to include the Gulf Oil Tower, the Grant Building and the Koppers Building. He loved greeting famous people who visited the city. One day we’ll post a collection of pictures of Kline welcoming notable folks — among them President Calvin Coolidge, Charles Lindbergh, Mary Astor, Richard Byrd and Gene Tunney. Kline also was the last Republican elected mayor of the city.

But perhaps Kline is known best as the city’s most corrupt politician. His trouble began with the purchase of a $1,350 rug he said would “dignify the mayor’s office.” That purchase fueled a controversy that led to Kline’s indictment in a purchasing scandal. Kline was sentenced to jail, but never served because of ill health. He died a few months after his conviction.

The infamous Kline rug remained in the mayor’s office, becoming threadbare over the years, until Sophie Masloff ordered it removed in 1992.

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

Feb. 14, 1985: "Young Steelers fan eats snow"
Nathan Binder, 2, of Evans City, not only enjoyed playing in the snow at Moraine State Park, but apparently he also found it tasty. We’re figuring Nathan is about 30 years old now.
(Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)
— Mila Sanina

Feb. 14, 1985: "Young Steelers fan eats snow"

Nathan Binder, 2, of Evans City, not only enjoyed playing in the snow at Moraine State Park, but apparently he also found it tasty. We’re figuring Nathan is about 30 years old now.

(Photo by Darrell Sapp, Post-Gazette)

— Mila Sanina

Oct. 9, 1960: "Diamond Market House"
At the massive Diamond Market House that sat at present-day Market Square, farmers, butchers and bakers sold fresh meat, vegetables and flowers directly to the public. On one of its upper floors, you could roller skate to the accompaniment of live organ music. 
Built between 1912 and 1917, the red brick, H-shaped structure was designed by Rutan and Russell. The market thrived for nearly 50 years. But with suburban expansion beyond the city’s core and the growth of shopping plazas featuring large supermarkets, business dwindled at the Downtown market. 
In December, 1959, a 35-pound hunk of cornice fell from the building, striking Mary Shelton of Forest Hills on her head and crushing her right foot. Afterward, city officials toured the building and found that it was dim, drafty, splattered with pigeon manure and in need of between $160,000 to $300,00 in repairs.
City officials also found that the Marketmen’s Association, which rented the building, was six months behind in payments. The building was razed in 1961.
Luckily for Downtown shoppers, farmers still come to Market Square to sell their produce. The appearance of their temporary stalls, which are set up every Thursday between spring and November, enlivens the plaza with color and commerce.
Go to the Post-Gazette’s  Pittsburgh Then and Now page to see how the square has changed since 1960.
(Photo by Morris Berman, Post-Gazette)
— Marylynne Pitz

Oct. 9, 1960: "Diamond Market House"

At the massive Diamond Market House that sat at present-day Market Square, farmers, butchers and bakers sold fresh meat, vegetables and flowers directly to the public. On one of its upper floors, you could roller skate to the accompaniment of live organ music. 

Built between 1912 and 1917, the red brick, H-shaped structure was designed by Rutan and Russell. The market thrived for nearly 50 years. But with suburban expansion beyond the city’s core and the growth of shopping plazas featuring large supermarkets, business dwindled at the Downtown market. 

In December, 1959, a 35-pound hunk of cornice fell from the building, striking Mary Shelton of Forest Hills on her head and crushing her right foot. Afterward, city officials toured the building and found that it was dim, drafty, splattered with pigeon manure and in need of between $160,000 to $300,00 in repairs.

City officials also found that the Marketmen’s Association, which rented the building, was six months behind in payments. The building was razed in 1961.

Luckily for Downtown shoppers, farmers still come to Market Square to sell their produce. The appearance of their temporary stalls, which are set up every Thursday between spring and November, enlivens the plaza with color and commerce.

Go to the Post-Gazette’s Pittsburgh Then and Now page to see how the square has changed since 1960.

(Photo by Morris Berman, Post-Gazette)

— Marylynne Pitz


June 24, 1987: "Beach Boys at the Civic Arena"

On the evening of June 24, 1987, the roof of the Civic Arena opened to the summer sky, delighting the 8,963 fans attending a Beach Boys concert that night. 



Bill Wade took this photograph from the U.S. Steel Tower after the roof opened at 9:12 p.m. 



It was an especially fun and memorable concert because the festive atmosphere included bouncing beach balls. Also, inside the arena, at stage right, there was a beach with six tons of sand, a grass hut, volleyball nets, umbrellas and inflatable beach toys. 



Fans were allowed to bring their own food, buy it at the Arena or have it catered by the Pittsburgh Hyatt. Some lucky people sat at tables on the floor; each table cost $600.  



Singer Brian Wilson was clean-shaven and slim. On vocals and keyboard was Bruce Johnston. 



"As always, the four Beach Boys and their six sidemen rattled through number after number as if their pants were on fire, yet still played each one with energy, conviction and skill. That’s their style," wrote Pete Bishop, a reviewer for The Pittsburgh Press.


(Photo by Bill Wade, Pittsburgh Press)

— Marylynne Pitz

June 24, 1987: "Beach Boys at the Civic Arena"

On the evening of June 24, 1987, the roof of the Civic Arena opened to the summer sky, delighting the 8,963 fans attending a Beach Boys concert that night. 

Bill Wade took this photograph from the U.S. Steel Tower after the roof opened at 9:12 p.m. 

It was an especially fun and memorable concert because the festive atmosphere included bouncing beach balls. Also, inside the arena, at stage right, there was a beach with six tons of sand, a grass hut, volleyball nets, umbrellas and inflatable beach toys. 

Fans were allowed to bring their own food, buy it at the Arena or have it catered by the Pittsburgh Hyatt. Some lucky people sat at tables on the floor; each table cost $600.  

Singer Brian Wilson was clean-shaven and slim. On vocals and keyboard was Bruce Johnston. 

"As always, the four Beach Boys and their six sidemen rattled through number after number as if their pants were on fire, yet still played each one with energy, conviction and skill. That’s their style," wrote Pete Bishop, a reviewer for The Pittsburgh Press.

(Photo by Bill Wade, Pittsburgh Press)

Oct. 11, 1949: "Steelers tight end Elbie Nickel"
This is one of those  endearingly corny pictures newspapers once published for organizations seeking publicity. Here, Steeler Elbie Nickel unconvincingly fakes a field goal attempt. Holding the ball with great enthusiasm is Vera Love, described in the caption as a “Carousel Ballerina.” The two were supporting a benefit for the Fireman’s Widows Pension Fund. Forbes Field was dressed in its football duds.
You may have heard of Nickel. He played for the Steelers from 1947-57 and was for years considered the best tight end in Steelers history. Then along came Heath Miller …
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

Oct. 11, 1949: "Steelers tight end Elbie Nickel"

This is one of those  endearingly corny pictures newspapers once published for organizations seeking publicity. Here, Steeler Elbie Nickel unconvincingly fakes a field goal attempt. Holding the ball with great enthusiasm is Vera Love, described in the caption as a “Carousel Ballerina.” The two were supporting a benefit for the Fireman’s Widows Pension Fund. Forbes Field was dressed in its football duds.

You may have heard of Nickel. He played for the Steelers from 1947-57 and was for years considered the best tight end in Steelers history. Then along came Heath Miller …

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

Circa 1903: "Travelers flock to Penn Station"
We at the Digs like to imagine the experience of arriving in Pittsburgh when the city was a growing industrial center. Certainly it was a smoky and smelly place, but Pittsburgh also offered grandeur rarely found outside New York or Chicago.
Pennsylvania Station, designed by the great urban architect Daniel Burnham, is one example. Travelers who arrived by train had the experience of walking through the station’s stunning concourse and rotunda. (You can see an interactive picture of what the rotunda looks like today at our Pittsburgh Revolution page.
The station is known to Pittsburghers as Penn Station and was completed in 1903 — we suspect this picture was made shortly after its opening. In the mid-1980s, Pennsylvania Station was converted to apartments.
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

Circa 1903: "Travelers flock to Penn Station"

We at the Digs like to imagine the experience of arriving in Pittsburgh when the city was a growing industrial center. Certainly it was a smoky and smelly place, but Pittsburgh also offered grandeur rarely found outside New York or Chicago.

Pennsylvania Station, designed by the great urban architect Daniel Burnham, is one example. Travelers who arrived by train had the experience of walking through the station’s stunning concourse and rotunda. (You can see an interactive picture of what the rotunda looks like today at our Pittsburgh Revolution page.

The station is known to Pittsburghers as Penn Station and was completed in 1903 — we suspect this picture was made shortly after its opening. In the mid-1980s, Pennsylvania Station was converted to apartments.

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

Dec. 9, 1928:  "Clearing snow at Schenley Plaza"
When Pittsburgh got its first big snowfall of the season in late 1928, the Pittsburgh Press dutifully sent out a photographer to document efforts to clear the city’s walkways.
We discovered this picture in a folder labeled “Schenley Park.” It was published on a page with several other snow pictures — images of children sledding, and snow-covered trees. The newspaper clipping contains no information about where the picture was shot, but we believe it shows Schenley Plaza, and that the strucure in the background is the Cathedral of Learning, then in the early stages of construction.
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

Dec. 9, 1928:  "Clearing snow at Schenley Plaza"

When Pittsburgh got its first big snowfall of the season in late 1928, the Pittsburgh Press dutifully sent out a photographer to document efforts to clear the city’s walkways.

We discovered this picture in a folder labeled “Schenley Park.” It was published on a page with several other snow pictures — images of children sledding, and snow-covered trees. The newspaper clipping contains no information about where the picture was shot, but we believe it shows Schenley Plaza, and that the strucure in the background is the Cathedral of Learning, then in the early stages of construction.

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

Nov. 21, 1982: "People board buses and trolleys at Smithfield and Forbes"
Remember when ‘Bicentennial Tour Trolleys” used to run downtown? Remember when buses looked like the one in this picture?
This Pittsburgh Press photo was taken in 1982. The description below the photo read more as an advice column for people dreading winters in Pittsburgh, and closed with a hopeful end: “Step gingerly over the slush, button up, wear your scarf and gloves, take it slow, leave work early, hold your temper, don’t drive if you can avoid it, be patient…. and spring will be here before you know it…”
Ahhh, spring!
(Photo by Robert Pavuchak, The Pittsburgh Press)
— Mila Sanina

Nov. 21, 1982: "People board buses and trolleys at Smithfield and Forbes"

Remember when ‘Bicentennial Tour Trolleys” used to run downtown? Remember when buses looked like the one in this picture?

This Pittsburgh Press photo was taken in 1982. The description below the photo read more as an advice column for people dreading winters in Pittsburgh, and closed with a hopeful end: “Step gingerly over the slush, button up, wear your scarf and gloves, take it slow, leave work early, hold your temper, don’t drive if you can avoid it, be patient…. and spring will be here before you know it…”

Ahhh, spring!

(Photo by Robert Pavuchak, The Pittsburgh Press)

— Mila Sanina

Dec. 26, 1985: “Pittsburghers party on New Year’s Eve”
Remember December of 1985? 
That was the year you could book a five-course dinner at the William Penn Hotel’s La Plume Restaurant on New Year’s Eve for $37.50 per person. That price included free parking in the Mellon Square Garage — always a selling point for Pittsburgh diners!  
But the unidentified couple and dog in this picture planned to greet the new year of 1986 while staying at home in their oh-so- retro kitchen. Nightclubbing was not on their agenda, according to a story in The Pittsburgh Press by Ann Butler. 
In her feature article, Ms. Butler quoted Barbara K. Shore, a professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh. People who plan to stay home on New Year’s Eve, Ms. Shore suggested, may wish to arrange a fun activity and invite friends to participate.
Ms. Shore’s also suggested lighting the candles and turning on the Christmas tree lights. Enjoy the last of the holiday cookies and don’t forget to break out the champagne at midnight.  Try out some new games. In 1985, Trivial Pursuit was still the favorite.  Or, go out to a movie. In 1985, some of the big hits were “Out of Africa,” “The Color Purple” and “A Chorus Line.” 
This time around, movie options include “Skyfall,” “Lincoln” and “Jack Reacher.”
Here at The Digs, we wish all of you a healthy and prosperous 2013!
(Photo by Andy Starnes, Pittsburgh Press)
— Marylynne Pitz

Dec. 26, 1985: Pittsburghers party on New Year’s Eve”

Remember December of 1985? 

That was the year you could book a five-course dinner at the William Penn Hotel’s La Plume Restaurant on New Year’s Eve for $37.50 per person. That price included free parking in the Mellon Square Garage — always a selling point for Pittsburgh diners!  

But the unidentified couple and dog in this picture planned to greet the new year of 1986 while staying at home in their oh-so- retro kitchen. Nightclubbing was not on their agenda, according to a story in The Pittsburgh Press by Ann Butler. 

In her feature article, Ms. Butler quoted Barbara K. Shore, a professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh. People who plan to stay home on New Year’s Eve, Ms. Shore suggested, may wish to arrange a fun activity and invite friends to participate.

Ms. Shore’s also suggested lighting the candles and turning on the Christmas tree lights. Enjoy the last of the holiday cookies and don’t forget to break out the champagne at midnight.  Try out some new games. In 1985, Trivial Pursuit was still the favorite.  Or, go out to a movie. In 1985, some of the big hits were “Out of Africa,” “The Color Purple” and “A Chorus Line.” 

This time around, movie options include “Skyfall,” “Lincoln” and “Jack Reacher.”

Here at The Digs, we wish all of you a healthy and prosperous 2013!

(Photo by Andy Starnes, Pittsburgh Press)

Dec. 20, 1980:  “Don Brockett’s “Big, Bad Burlesque’  as part of the New Year’s Eve celebration”
A 2 a.m. performance of Don Brockett’s “Big, Bad Burlesque” was part of the New Year’s Eve celebration at the Marriott in Green Tree.  
Don Brockett was the “premier parodist of Pittsburgh” and its “emperor of entertainment.” That’s how Chris Rawson, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s  senior drama critic, described him in in an obituary published in 1995. 
A barrel chested, multi-talented entertainer with a raspy voice, Mr. Brockett was a writer, composer, director and producer of musicals and satirical cabaret shows. Over a period of 30 years, he employed more than 1,000 entertainers, many of whom went on to careers on  Broadway or in films. Brockett alumni include Michael Keaton and Rob Marshall.   
This picture features entertainers from “Big, Bad Burlesque,” a cabaret hit Mr. Brockett ran off and on for 25 years. This particular cast appeared at the Marriott in Green Tree during a 2 a.m. performance for  New Year’s revelers who stayed up late after greeting the dawn of 1981. 
Kneeling down in front is David Wilson. From left to right, the male players are Doug Mertz, Gordon Lowe in the middle and Harry O’Toole on the right. The four ladies remain a mystery.  The picture, which appeared in the Sunday Pittsburgh Press on Dec. 21, 1980 does not identify the individual cast members.
(Photo by Kent Badger, The Pittsburgh Press)
—Marylynne Pitz

Dec. 20, 1980:  “Don Brockett’s “Big, Bad Burlesque’  as part of the New Year’s Eve celebration”

A 2 a.m. performance of Don Brockett’s “Big, Bad Burlesque” was part of the New Year’s Eve celebration at the Marriott in Green Tree.  

Don Brockett was the “premier parodist of Pittsburgh” and its “emperor of entertainment.” That’s how Chris Rawson, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s  senior drama critic, described him in in an obituary published in 1995. 

A barrel chested, multi-talented entertainer with a raspy voice, Mr. Brockett was a writer, composer, director and producer of musicals and satirical cabaret shows. Over a period of 30 years, he employed more than 1,000 entertainers, many of whom went on to careers on  Broadway or in films. Brockett alumni include Michael Keaton and Rob Marshall.   

This picture features entertainers from “Big, Bad Burlesque,” a cabaret hit Mr. Brockett ran off and on for 25 years. This particular cast appeared at the Marriott in Green Tree during a 2 a.m. performance for  New Year’s revelers who stayed up late after greeting the dawn of 1981. 

Kneeling down in front is David Wilson. From left to right, the male players are Doug Mertz, Gordon Lowe in the middle and Harry O’Toole on the right. The four ladies remain a mystery.  The picture, which appeared in the Sunday Pittsburgh Press on Dec. 21, 1980 does not identify the individual cast members.

(Photo by Kent Badger, The Pittsburgh Press)

—Marylynne Pitz

Jan. 1, 1962:  ”Gus Brickner prepares to swim the icy Allegheny River”
If you’re making a list of the toughest dudes in Pittsburgh history, Gus Brickner certainly has to be near the top. Brickner was a steelworker from Charleroi who gained fame as an endurance swimmer unaffected by cold weather. He’s probably best known for his annual New Year’s Day plunge into the Monongahela River, a tradition continued by our city’s Polar Bear Club.
But Brickner’s most amazing feat occurred Jan. 24, 1963. On that day, as temperatures dipped to 18 degrees below zero, Brickner swam the width of the Monongahela River at Dunlevy. A towboat ahead of him smashed a path through ice 10 inches thick. “My whole body was encased in ice as soon as I got out of the water,” Brickner told a reporter.
The effort set a cold-weather swimming record that will stand forever. Guinness closed the category for safety reasons after several people died trying to surpass Brickner.
Brickner twice attempted to swim the English Channel. In 1957, he was pulled from the water 4 1/2 miles from his goal. He came closer in 1960, but lost consciousness 400 yards from shore. The swim took 18 hours. He lost 18 pounds.
Brickner swam every day except Christmas. By 1985, he had logged more than 38,000 miles. After tacking on 500 more, he stopped counting. That was in 1986. Brickner was 75 years old. He kept swimming for pleasure until his death at age 79 in 1991.
(Photo credit: Unknown)
— Steve Mellon

Jan. 1, 1962:  ”Gus Brickner prepares to swim the icy Allegheny River”

If you’re making a list of the toughest dudes in Pittsburgh history, Gus Brickner certainly has to be near the top. Brickner was a steelworker from Charleroi who gained fame as an endurance swimmer unaffected by cold weather. He’s probably best known for his annual New Year’s Day plunge into the Monongahela River, a tradition continued by our city’s Polar Bear Club.

But Brickner’s most amazing feat occurred Jan. 24, 1963. On that day, as temperatures dipped to 18 degrees below zero, Brickner swam the width of the Monongahela River at Dunlevy. A towboat ahead of him smashed a path through ice 10 inches thick. “My whole body was encased in ice as soon as I got out of the water,” Brickner told a reporter.

The effort set a cold-weather swimming record that will stand forever. Guinness closed the category for safety reasons after several people died trying to surpass Brickner.

Brickner twice attempted to swim the English Channel. In 1957, he was pulled from the water 4 1/2 miles from his goal. He came closer in 1960, but lost consciousness 400 yards from shore. The swim took 18 hours. He lost 18 pounds.

Brickner swam every day except Christmas. By 1985, he had logged more than 38,000 miles. After tacking on 500 more, he stopped counting. That was in 1986. Brickner was 75 years old. He kept swimming for pleasure until his death at age 79 in 1991.

(Photo credit: Unknown)

— Steve Mellon

Feb. 2, 1985: "Clash of styles and seasons Downtown Pittsburgh"
This clash of styles occurred on Fifth Avenue, Downtown, when shoppers bundled up against the district’s severe wintry blasts of wind and snow that day passed a shop window filled with mannequins that were dressed for a warmer season or another place.
This standalone photo was published in The Pittsburgh Press with a cutline: “Think Summer.” 
(Photo by Bill Wade, Pittsburgh Press)
— Mila Sanina

Feb. 2, 1985: "Clash of styles and seasons Downtown Pittsburgh"

This clash of styles occurred on Fifth Avenue, Downtown, when shoppers bundled up against the district’s severe wintry blasts of wind and snow that day passed a shop window filled with mannequins that were dressed for a warmer season or another place.

This standalone photo was published in The Pittsburgh Press with a cutline: “Think Summer.” 

(Photo by Bill Wade, Pittsburgh Press)

— Mila Sanina

Dec. 4, 1948: "Christmas Parade"
Back in 1948, Mt. Lebanon residents greeted Santa Claus with fanfare as the Washington Road business district officially became “Santa Claus Lane.”

This Pittsburgh Press photo shows crowds lining the sidewalks as Santa appeared, behind a blaring band. Santa’s vehicle, drawn by six white horses, was followed by clowns, holiday floats, fire engines and an amphibious duck. Another band brought up the rear of the parade.

A banner strung across Washington Road urged people to “Shop in Mt. Lebanon,” proof that the idea of supporting local businesses instead of large chain stores is not a new consumer philosophy. 

By the 1950s, Mt. Lebanon, one of the region’s oldest streetcar suburbs, had widened Washington Road and paved over the bricked street. The marquee for Stevenson Realtors is still there. Today, the business is called Stevenson Williams Management Co. 

On this occasion, we at the Digs would like to wish you and yours a Merry Christmas!!
(The Pittsburgh Press photo)
— Marylynne Pitz

Dec. 4, 1948: "Christmas Parade"

Back in 1948, Mt. Lebanon residents greeted Santa Claus with fanfare as the Washington Road business district officially became “Santa Claus Lane.”

This Pittsburgh Press photo shows crowds lining the sidewalks as Santa appeared, behind a blaring band. Santa’s vehicle, drawn by six white horses, was followed by clowns, holiday floats, fire engines and an amphibious duck. Another band brought up the rear of the parade.

A banner strung across Washington Road urged people to “Shop in Mt. Lebanon,” proof that the idea of supporting local businesses instead of large chain stores is not a new consumer philosophy. 

By the 1950s, Mt. Lebanon, one of the region’s oldest streetcar suburbs, had widened Washington Road and paved over the bricked street. The marquee for Stevenson Realtors is still there. Today, the business is called Stevenson Williams Management Co. 

On this occasion, we at the Digs would like to wish you and yours a Merry Christmas!!

(The Pittsburgh Press photo)

Marylynne Pitz