July 2, 1989: Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff waves goodbye to residents of the Garfield Senior High Rise after hearing tenant complaints. Ms. Masloff brought a unique sense of style to the mayor’s office when she ascended to the post in 1988. Who couldn’t love a grandmotherly politician who proudly spoke “Pittsburghese” in a voice that sometimes morphed into a hair-raising screech (remember her imitation of Mike Lange’s “Scratch my back with a hacksaw” during a 1992 Pens rally?) and once mistakenly referred to the legendary rock musician Bruce Springsteen as “Bruce Bedsprings?” 
For all her folksy, unpolished charm, though, Ms. Masloff was a determined civic leader. She was elected to city council in a 1976 special election, and was reelected three times. When the city’s popular mayor, Richard Caligiuri, died in 1988, Ms. Masloff was 70 years old and serving as council president — a post that put her in line to assume the city’s top office. Ms. Masloff became Pittsburgh’s first female and first Jewish mayor. She was elected to a full term in 1989 but four years later decided against seeking another term and retired to her home in Squirrel Hill.
(Photo by Melissa Farlow, Pittsburgh Press)
— Steve Mellon
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July 2, 1989: Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff waves goodbye to residents of the Garfield Senior High Rise after hearing tenant complaints. Ms. Masloff brought a unique sense of style to the mayor’s office when she ascended to the post in 1988. Who couldn’t love a grandmotherly politician who proudly spoke “Pittsburghese” in a voice that sometimes morphed into a hair-raising screech (remember her imitation of Mike Lange’s “Scratch my back with a hacksaw” during a 1992 Pens rally?) and once mistakenly referred to the legendary rock musician Bruce Springsteen as “Bruce Bedsprings?”

For all her folksy, unpolished charm, though, Ms. Masloff was a determined civic leader. She was elected to city council in a 1976 special election, and was reelected three times. When the city’s popular mayor, Richard Caligiuri, died in 1988, Ms. Masloff was 70 years old and serving as council president — a post that put her in line to assume the city’s top office. Ms. Masloff became Pittsburgh’s first female and first Jewish mayor. She was elected to a full term in 1989 but four years later decided against seeking another term and retired to her home in Squirrel Hill.

(Photo by Melissa Farlow, Pittsburgh Press)

Steve Mellon


Order this photo at PG Store

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