April 15, 1951:  A few weeks ago, we discovered this picture of a Lawrenceville park dedication in our files, and when we carefully peeled away a clipping glued to the back of the print we found the image was credited to “Hare.” We were thrilled. Clyde Hare was a legendary photographer who documented Pittsburgh for more than half a century.
Hare came to Pittsburgh to work with Roy Stryker, considered the father of photojournalism, and covered the city’s Rennaissance from 1950 to 1953 for the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. His work was published in premier national magazines like National Geographic and Life.
This picture of Duncan Park at 54th and Duncan streets is emblematic of Hare’s style. It documents an event while at the same time showing enough of the neighborhood and topography to give readers what photographers call “a sense of place.” Known for his infectious chuckle and selflessness, Hare was a true Pittsburgh character. He died at age 82 in 2009.
Want to see how this section of Lawrenceville has changed in the past 60 years? Check out Rebecca Droke’s "Pittsburgh Then and Now" feature.
(Photo by Clyde Hare)
— Steve Mellon

April 15, 1951:  A few weeks ago, we discovered this picture of a Lawrenceville park dedication in our files, and when we carefully peeled away a clipping glued to the back of the print we found the image was credited to “Hare.” We were thrilled. Clyde Hare was a legendary photographer who documented Pittsburgh for more than half a century.

Hare came to Pittsburgh to work with Roy Stryker, considered the father of photojournalism, and covered the city’s Rennaissance from 1950 to 1953 for the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. His work was published in premier national magazines like National Geographic and Life.

This picture of Duncan Park at 54th and Duncan streets is emblematic of Hare’s style. It documents an event while at the same time showing enough of the neighborhood and topography to give readers what photographers call “a sense of place.” Known for his infectious chuckle and selflessness, Hare was a true Pittsburgh character. He died at age 82 in 2009.

Want to see how this section of Lawrenceville has changed in the past 60 years? Check out Rebecca Droke’s "Pittsburgh Then and Now" feature.

(Photo by Clyde Hare)

— Steve Mellon

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